Stone Care

Caring for a stone sink is not nearly as complicated as most people think. Our stones were selected specifically because they are tough and will provide many years of low or no maintenance. For cleaning all you’ll need is dishwashing soap and bleach. Tough food stains (including wine & beets) may appear on your sink, but can easily be removed with common bleach without harming the stone, the one exception is Black Lava, so please refrain from using bleach on this stone as it may affect the stone color.

MARBLE/ The marble we use has 0% water absorption, this means any stains will not be able to penetrate into the stone, they will only be on the surface and can easily be removed with either soap or bleach (for tough stains), avoid abrasive pads and cleansers. If you want to maintain the high gloss polished look for marble, try to avoid acidic foods (lemon juice, etc.) from sitting in your marble sink, as these may dull or etch the finish. However over years of use this is typically unavoidable and can be considered part of the natural aging beauty of a stone sink. If on the other hand you prefer that new high polished look, consider using a stone gloss enhancer once a year or as needed.

LIMESTONE/ Same as marble.

PETRIFIED WOOD, TRAVERTINE & BLACK LAVA/ All have some naturally occurring holes which required filling during the production process, the filling is a mixture of epoxy and ground stone, and should not need maintenance for many years to come, but just like a cavity tooth filling, at some point it may come loose and require re-filling, this can be done with 100% epoxy (for small holes) or with a small amount of ground stone added, just be sure the hole is clean and dry, fill, let completely cure (24-48 hours), using a razor blade slice off any excess. Having said that, it is not uncommon for these sinks to last 10 years or more without any maintenance. Chemical sealers and impregnators are recommended for black lava, travertine, and petrified wood. Please contact us for any questions or concerns you may have.

GRANITE/ This is one of the toughest stones available. Don’t need to worry about sealing this one. Hard water spots may appear on a dark stone like these but can be easily removed with a common razor blade. Use any soap or bleach.

We sincerely hope you enjoy your new stone sink, after all it is one-of-a-kind!

Due to the porous nature of stone, there are certain substances that can stain your sink if not properly protected. The longer a stain remains, the deeper it penetrates and becomes more permanent; therefore, it is important to remove a stain as soon as it occurs. Rustic Sinks recommend that you wipe up spills immediately and do not allow surface deposits of water bi-products such as calcium, salt, lime or detergents to build up on your stone sink. To clean your sink, use a soft cloth or sponge. Be sure to rinse the sink well after cleaning and dry. Cleaning on a regular basis will help prevent the development of hard water deposits. If you develop persistent stains, try a non-abrasive cleaner such as dishwasher soap, or a professional stone cleaner such as Stone Tech Revitalizer daily cleaner. Do not use any acidic cleaners, abrasive cleaning pads, ammonia, abrasive or soft paste cleaners, vinegar, alcohol, window cleaners or lemon juice.

If you are wanting to darken the stone color of your sink or enhance the veining, you can use a stone sealer and enhancer treatment. You can find products at many home improvement stores. Just wipe it all over with a small mount and rub any excess with a micro fiber cloth. This should last for years.